New Hampshire Audubon’s Rare Bird Alert for Monday, December 25th, 2017

Posted on December 26, 2017

This is New Hampshire Audubon’s Rare Bird Alert for Monday, December 25th, 2017.

A WESTERN TANAGER continues to be seen at a private residence in Dover, and was last reported on December 24th. There is no public access.

A male BARROW’S GOLDENEYE continues to be seen near Stark Landing on the Merrimack River in Manchester and was last reported on December 20th.

2 RAZORBILLS were seen on the Piscataqua River in New Castle on December 20th.

A SNOWY OWL was seen in Keene near the back of Kohl’s on December 19th, but has not been reported since then. A SNOWY OWL was discovered at the Lebanon Airport on December 18th, and was last reported on December 24th. 2 or 3 SNOWY OWLS were reported from the coast in Rye and North Hampton during the past week.

A SHORT-EARED OWL was seen just north of Odiorne Point State Park in Rye on December 24th.

A YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER was discovered at the Seabrook Wastewater Treatment Plant on December 2nd and was last reported there on the 19th.

An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was discovered earlier this month in pine trees at the Beach Plum restaurant located opposite North Hampton State Beach, and was last reported on December 24th.

A CAPE MAY WARBLER was discovered in a pine tree at Bicentennial Park in Hampton on December 1st, and was last reported on the 25th.

A YELLOW WARBLER was discovered in cedar trees north of Bicentennial Park in Hampton on December 1st, and was last reported on the 25th.

A YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER continues to be seen outside the Errol Library, and was last reported on December 24th. Another YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER was reported from the hydroelectric station in Gorham on the 24th.

A BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER was discovered in pines at the intersection of Central Road and Route 1A in Rye on November 26th, and was last reported on December 25th. A RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET also continues to be seen here and was last reported on the 21st.

Up to 4 AMERICAN PIPITS were reported from the coast during the past week.

An EASTERN TOWHEE continues to be seen at a private residence in Wilton and was last reported on December 24th.

A FOX SPARROW was seen in Concord on December 21st.

Single YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS were seen in Sutton, Antrim, Hancock, Northwood, and Nottingham during the past week.

22 SNOW BUNTINGS were seen in fields on Barnett Hill in Walpole on December 20th, and 30 HORNED LARKS were seen at Pinnacleview Equipment in Walpole on the 21st.

A PEREGRINE FALCON was seen in Hampton on December 24th, and 1 was seen in Nashua on the 18th.

A NORTHERN GOSHAWK was seen in Etna on December 22nd, and a RED-SHOULDERED HAWK was seen in Durham on the 21st.

A male WOOD DUCK was seen on the ice below the Lakeport Dam in Laconia on December 19th.

A GREAT BLUE HERON was seen on the Powwow River in Kingston on December 20th.

The Christmas Bird Count takes place every year in designated areas called “count circles”. These circles are 15 miles in diameter and stay the same from year to year. International in scope, the Christmas Bird Count is organized and compiled by the National Audubon Society, who coordinates all count circles so they don’t overlap.

There are 21 counts in New Hampshire, and participation is open to all interested birders, from beginners to experts. Many count circles are coordinated by NH Audubon Chapters. Each count circle is surveyed on its own particular day, between December 14 and January 5. Teams go outside and survey sections of the count circle, but there are also feeder watchers within the circle who tally the birds in their backyards.

Visit the NH Bird Records website for a list of the state’s Christmas Bird Counts and who to contact if you are interested in participating.

This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred. If you have seen any interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the recording or send your sightings to the RBA via e-mail at: birdsetc@nhaudubon.org. Please put either “bird sighting” or “Rare Bird Alert” in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and phone number.

Thanks very much and good birding.