NH Audubon Offers Insiders View to Conservation Work

Posted on September 23, 2015

Presentations from field biologists offer glimpse into the agency’s work on Whip-poor-wills, raptors and nighthawks

Common Nighthawk by Rebecca Suomala

Common Nighthawk by Rebecca Suomala

NH Audubon is offering a special look into the conservation department’s core projects dedicated to preserving disappearing Whip-poor-wills, its Project Nighthawk initiative, and the influx of Golden Eagles visiting the Granite State. It is doing so through a lecture series that began Tuesday, September 22 and continues through November 5.

“The staff of NH Audubon’s Conservation Department does amazing work throughout the year – many heard about the banding of Peregrine Falcon chicks – and we want to highlight some of the other initiatives that our biologists’ are working hard on,” said Sean Gillery, Director of Membership and Development at NH Audubon. “These programs will let them share some of what they do to protect New Hampshire’s wildlife and connect the public to the staff, stories, research, and adventures that make the work of NH Audubon so special and important”

The series’ events include:

All programs are held at the McLane Audubon Center, 84 Silk Farm Road in Concord. The programs are free, however donations are always appreciated. Registration is not required.

Golden Eagle

Golden Eagle

About New Hampshire Audubon
Founded in 1914, New Hampshire Audubon’s mission is to protect New Hampshire’s natural environment for wildlife and for people. It is an independent statewide membership organization with four nature centers throughout the state. Expert educators give programs to children, families, and adults at centers and in schools. Staff biologists and volunteers conduct bird conservation efforts such as the Peregrine Falcon restoration. New Hampshire Audubon protects thousands of acres of wildlife habitat and is a voice for sound public policy on environmental issues. For information on New Hampshire Audubon, including membership, volunteering, programs, sanctuaries, and publications, call 224-9909, or visit nhaudubon.org.