Lands

NH Audubon owns and manages 39 wildlife sanctuaries throughout all 10 counties of New Hampshire. In addition, there are several other properties on which NH Audubon has a management agreement with another entity. These lands, covering over 8,000 acres in all of important wildlife habitat, provide opportunities for recreation, wildlife watching, education, and reflective experiences. Three sanctuaries have associated nature centers, and many have interpretive trail guides and well-developed trail systems. A variety of wildlife management techniques are ongoing at our sanctuaries, and others are left to natural processes. Through habitat management, research, education, and continued land protection we are working to ensure that New Hampshire’s wildlife and natural heritage is protected for us all.

NH Audubon wildlife sanctuaries are open to the public and free of charge. We hope you enjoy visiting them and are interested in helping support wildlife conservation by making a donation. If you have questions, please contact us at (603) 224-9909 or at [email protected].

 

Photos, from the top: Black Fox Pond, Deering Wildlife Sanctuary, by Diane De Luca; a view of Willard Pond from Bald Mountain along the Tamposi Trail, by Phil Brown; kayaking on Lake Massabesic, staff photo; a rainstorm over Goodhue Hill from Bald Mountain on the Willard Pond Wildlife Sanctuary in Antrim, by Phil Brown; Peregrine Falcon, by Stefan Vozarik.

Explore 39 wildlife sanctuaries throughout all 10 counties of New Hampshire.

Committed to the conservation of ecologically important lands.

We regularly observe and count 14 species at NH Audubon’s Raptor Observatories.

NH Audubon Protects

The New Hampshire Audubon offers multiple opportunities for those interested in joining us as a member or donating for one of our various causes.

About Us

Founded in 1914, NH Audubon’s mission is to protect New Hampshire’s natural environment for wildlife and for people. It is an independent statewide membership organization with four nature centers throughout the state. Expert educators give programs to children, families, and adults at centers and in schools. Staff biologists and volunteers conduct bird conservation efforts such as the Peregrine Falcon restoration. NH Audubon protects thousands of acres of wildlife habitat and is a voice for sound public policy on environmental issues. For information on NH Audubon, including membership, volunteering, programs, sanctuaries, and publications, call 224-9909, or visit www.nhaudubon.org.