News & Events

New Hampshire Audubon's Rare Bird Alert for Monday, June 22nd, 2020

This is New Hampshire Audubon’s Rare Bird Alert for Monday, June 22nd, 2020.
During the Corona virus outbreak NH Audubon encourages you to enjoy birding safely; please follow travel and social distance recommendations from state and federal authorities.
There was an unconfirmed report of a SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER seen near Filter Bed Road in Wolfeboro on June 17th, but it has not been relocated.
There was an unconfirmed report of a female BULLOCK’S ORIOLE at a private residence in Deerfield on June 18th, but it has not been reported again.
A BLACK VULTURE was seen in Portsmouth on June 15th and 16th, and 2 were seen at the Wantastiquet Natural Area in Hinsdale on the 20th.
A SANDHILL CRANE was seen on the Great Brook Trail in Deerfield on June 13th, 2020. The bird was seen near the east end of the trail off of Coffeetown Road but has not reported again.
Up to 3 LEAST BITTERNS continue to be seen at the Cranberry Ponds located behind the Price Chopper in West Lebanon and were last reported on June 20th.
MISSISSIPPI KITES continued to be reported from Madbury Road in Durham and from various locations in Newmarket, Stratham, and Greenland, all during the past week. They have been successfully nesting in several of these towns for a number of years.
A few pairs of PIPING PLOVERS and LEAST TERNS are nesting at Hampton Beach State Park. Please tread carefully and respect these nesting and foraging birds. Young PIPING PLOVERS leave the nest right after hatching, are tiny and difficult to see, and can be easily injured or killed by an errant footstep, beach ball, or Frisbee.
A nesting pair of RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS continues to be seen at Bear Brook State Park and was last reported on June 19th.
3 RED CROSSBILLS were reported from Wapack National Wildlife Refuge, and 3 were reported from Hancock, all during the past week.
6 HORNED LARKS were seen at Pease International Tradeport on June 19th.
11 AMERICAN PIPIT breeding territories were found above treeline on Mount Washington on June 18th.
A FOX SPARROW was reported from the Dixville area on June 21st.
7 PURPLE MARTINS were seen from Cross Beach Road in Seabrook on June 17th.
There have been an unusual number of YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOOS reported during the past few weeks. Most have been heard but not seen.


New Hampshire Audubon’s Rare Bird Alert is sponsored by Bangor Savings Bank.
This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred. If you have seen any interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the recording or send your sightings to the RBA via email. Please put either “bird sighting” or “Rare Bird Alert” in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and phone number.
Thanks very much and good birding.
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Founded in 1914, NH Audubon’s mission is to protect New Hampshire’s natural environment for wildlife and for people. It is an independent statewide membership organization with four nature centers throughout the state. Expert educators give programs to children, families, and adults at centers and in schools. Staff biologists and volunteers conduct bird conservation efforts such as the Peregrine Falcon restoration. NH Audubon protects thousands of acres of wildlife habitat and is a voice for sound public policy on environmental issues. For information on NH Audubon, including membership, volunteering, programs, sanctuaries, and publications, call 224-9909, or visit www.nhaudubon.org.