News & Events

NH Audubon Recognizes Individuals for Their Conservation Efforts at 103rd Annual Meeting

At its 104th  Annual Meeting, NH Audubon announced its 2018 conservation award winners.
Tudor Richards Award – Nanci Mitchell of Gilmanton, NH
Goodhue-Elkins Award – Rich Aaronian and Paul Lacourse of Exeter, NH and Peggy Meyette of Cornish, NH

Bob Quinn (left) receiving the 2018 John Thalheimer Volunteer of the Year Award from NH Audubon President, Doug Bechtel. Photo by Dyanna Smith.

John Thalheimer Volunteer of the Year Award – Robert A. Quinn of Webster, NH
President’s Award – Bill Smagula of Eversource
(For details on each recipient, click the links below.)
The Tudor Richards Award was presented to Nanci Mitchell of Gilmanton, NH for working tirelessly and effectively for conservation in the Granite State. Nanci has worked to protect land and wildlife wherever she’s lived. She was a founding member of the Nichols-Smith Conservation Land Trust, created to protect the Beaver Brook Association land in Hollis, and the Belknap Range Conservation Coalition which recently protected Piper Mountain in the Belknap Range. Nanci is the quintessential grassroots worker with clear vision who makes local land protection happen, contagiously passionate about land protection and environmental stewardship.
The Goodhue-Elkins Award was given to three educators, in recognition of their outstanding contributions to the education of young people about birds: Rich Aaronian of Exeter, NH; Paul Lacourse of Exeter, NH, and Peggy Meyette of Cornish, NH. Each has devoted decades of their lives to educating children through their enthusiasm and love of birds. All three of these individuals have introduced countless children of all ages to birds and left a lasting legacy of knowledge and caring about birds among the youth of New Hampshire.
The Volunteer of the Year Award was presented to Robert A. Quinn of Webster, NH. Bob has been volunteering for NH Audubon for more than 40 years in many different capacities. He freely shares his knowledge of birds and is always ready to lend a hand, from carrying buckets of gravel onto a rooftop for Project Nighthawk to checking on an eagle nest. Whether as a trustee, President of the Capital Chapter, or field trip leader, Bob is always inspiring others to volunteer for NH Audubon’s bird conservation efforts and to support the organization.
The President’s Award was given to Bill Smagula for outstanding commitment to NH Audubon’s mission and success. Bill was a long time employee of Eversource (formerly Public Service of New Hampshire) and a dedicated partner in the Amoskeag Fishways Learning and Visitor Center, for which NH Audubon is the managing partner. He was a strong ally, friend, and supporter of the Center’s work and the partnership. He helped to make this environmental education center an award winning place where people can explore the Merrimack River watershed with interactive exhibits and learn the importance of wise stewardship of our water resources.

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Founded in 1914, NH Audubon’s mission is to protect New Hampshire’s natural environment for wildlife and for people. It is an independent statewide membership organization with four nature centers throughout the state. Expert educators give programs to children, families, and adults at centers and in schools. Staff biologists and volunteers conduct bird conservation efforts such as the Peregrine Falcon restoration. NH Audubon protects thousands of acres of wildlife habitat and is a voice for sound public policy on environmental issues. For information on NH Audubon, including membership, volunteering, programs, sanctuaries, and publications, call 224-9909, or visit www.nhaudubon.org.