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This is New Hampshire Audubon’s Rare Bird Alert for Monday, January 1, 2024

A MACGILLIVRAY’S WARBLER, first reported from Hollis on December 26th, was seen several times during the past week, and was last reported on the 30th.

An ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER continued to be seen during the past week, and was last reported on December 26th.

A VIRGINIA’S WARBLER, and 3 ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS continued to be seen at Bicentennial Park in Hampton during the past week and were last reported on January 1st.

2 WILSON’S WARBLER, and a PALM WARBLER were seen at the Hampton Wastewater Treatment Plant on several days during the past week.

A BLACK|-AND-WHITE WARBLER was seen at the Community Transportation Center trail in Dover on December 26th.

A PALM WARBLER was seen at the Gumpus Pond conservation area in Pelham on December 27th, and a PINE WARBLER was seen in Newfields on January 1st.

A COMMON YELLOWTHROAT was reported from Center Harbor, 1 was reported from Hollis, and 1 was reported from Great Bay, all during the past week.

A BLACK-HEADED GULL was seen at Little Harbor in New Castle on December 26th.

An Atlantic Puffin was seen at Star Island, one of the Isles of Shoals, a Dovekie was seen in Rye Harbor, and a Common Murre was seen at Fort Constitution in New Castle, all on January 1. (Photo by Jim Sparrell. Atlantic Puffin on January 1, 2024, from the Isles of Shoals.)

An ATLANTIC PUFFIN was seen at Star Island, one of the Isles of Shoals, a DOVEKIE was seen in Rye Harbor, and a COMMON MURRE was seen at Fort Constitution in New Castle, all on January 1st.

4 BLACK VULTURES were seen at the Connecticut River in Walpole on January 1st.

There was an unconfirmed report of a SHORT-EARED OWL from Arboretum Drive in Newington on January 1st.

A female KING EIDER continues to be seen in coastal Rye, often from Route 1A pullouts south of Odiorne Point State Park. It was last reported on January 1st.

A male BARROW’S GOLDENEYE was seen was seen on Opechee Bay in Laconia on January 1st, 1 was seen from Stark Landing on the Merrimack River in Manchester on January 1st, 1 was seen near the Granite Street Bridge on the Merrimack River in Manchester on December 30th, and 1 was seen on Great Bay in Durham on the 27th.

A RED-BREASTED MERGANSER was seen on Spofford Lake, 1 was seen on Lake Winnipesauke, and 1 was seen on Lake Kanasatka, all during the past week.

A NORTHERN SHOVELER was seen from the Wentworth-Coolidge Historical Site in Portsmouth on January 1st.

3 GADWALLS were seen at Upper Peverly Pond in Great Bay National Wildlife Refuge, and 2 were seen at the Ashland Wastewater Treatment Plant, all on January 1st

2 NORTHERN PINTAILS were seen on Loon Lake, 1 was seen on Lake Winnipesauke, and 1 was seen on Little Squam Lake, all during the past week.

2 RING-NECKED DUCKS were seen at the Center Harbor Sewage Treatment Plant in Moultonborough on December 30th.

A flock of 13 GREATER SCAUP and 8 LESSER SCAUP was seen on Opechee Bay in Laconia on January 1st. A flock of 8 GREATER SCAUP and 8 LESSER SCAUP was seen on Spofford Lake on January 1st. A LESSER SCAUP was seen at the Wilder Dam reservoir on the Connecticut River in Lebanon on the 29th.

A WHITE-WINGED SCOTER was seen on Spofford Lake on January 1st.

A NORTHERN SHRIKE was seen along Ossipee Mountain Road in Moultonborough on January 1st.

A flock of 10 RED CROSSBILLS was reported from Canterbury on December 25th, a flock of 17 was reported from Wilton on the 29th, a flock of 15 was seen in Concord on the 29th, a flock of 12 was reported from Laconia on the 29th, a flock of 10 was reported from Brookline on the 28th, a flock of 10 was reported from Newbury on the 26th, and smaller numbers were reported from scattered locations, all during the past week.

A FOX SPARROW was seen in Laconia, and 2 WHITE CROWNED SPARROWS were seen in Portsmouth, all on January 1st.

An AMERICAN WOODCOCK was seen in Woodstock on December 28th, and

2 VIRGINIA RAILS were reported from Hollis on December 27th.

Additional lingering migrant species reported during the past week included: RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, AMERICAN KESTREL, MERLIN, TURKEY VULTURE, BUFFLEHEAD, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, HERMIT THRUSH, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, AMERICAN PIPIT, MARSH WREN, WINTER WREN, GRAY CATBIRD, BROWN THRASHER, EASTERN TOWHEE, LINCOLN’S SPARROW, FIELD SPARROW, CHIPPING SPARROW, SAVANNAH SPARROW, SWAMP SPARROW, RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD, RUSTY BLACKBIRD, and FISH CROW.

This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred.

If you have seen any interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the recording or send your sightings to the RBA via email. Please put either “bird sighting” or “Rare Bird Alert” in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and phone number.

NEW! Hot off the presses:
Birding Northern New Hampshire by Robert A. Quinn
Boreal birds and dramatic vistas await you most any time of the year in New Hampshire’s North Country. Follow birder and naturalist Robert A. Quinn’s detailed new guide, Birding Northern New Hampshire, to the best birding in northern Coos County. All proceeds go to NH Audubon. For more info and to order a copy, check out this link.

Learn more about birds and birding in New Hampshire with New Hampshire Bird Records (read a free article in each issue). This quarterly publication is produced by NH Audubon thanks to the work of many volunteers. It is available for free in digital format to all NH Audubon members, and also by print for an additional fee.

Thanks very much and good birding.