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This is New Hampshire Audubon’s Rare Bird Alert for Monday, January 10, 2022

This is New Hampshire Audubon’s Rare Bird Alert for Monday, January 10, 2022.

A SNOWY OWL was seen in coastal Seabrook and Hampton, and 1 was seen in coastal Rye, both on several days during the past week. A SHORT-EARED OWL was seen at Hampton Beach State Park on January 4th, and 1 was seen along Wentworth Hill Road in Center Sandwich on the 3rd.

A SNOWY OWL was seen in coastal Seabrook and Hampton, and 1 was seen in coastal Rye, both on several days during the past week. (Photo by Len Medlock, 2013.)

Be sure to stay at a distance from any owls and do not disturb them – see the link below:

https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/birds-and-birding/snowy-owl-viewing-ethics

A NORTHERN HARRIER was seen at Chickering Farm in Westmoreland on January 8th, and 1 was seen at the Dillant-Hopkins Airport in Swanzey on the 5th.

A LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL, and a hybrid between a HERRING GULL and a GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULL, were both seen at Eel Pond in Rye on January 5th. An ICELAND GULL and a female BARROW’S GOLDENEYE were seen at Eel Pond on the 6th.

A GLAUCOUS GULL was seen in Hampton Harbor during the past week.

3 DOVEKIES, and 2 NORTHERN FULMARS were seen offshore at Jeffrey’s Ledge on January 4th.

A SNOW GOOSE was seen at Jackson’s Landing, and 1 was seen at Moore Fields on Route 155A, both in Durham during the past week.

3 BARROW’S GOLDENEYES were seen from Stark Landing on the Merrimack River in Manchester on January 8th, and a hybrid cross between a COMMON GOLDENEYE and a BARROW’S GOLDENEYE was reported from there on the 4th.

A REDHEAD was seen in the southwest part of Great Bay in Greenland on January 4th.

2 NORTHERN PINTAILS were seen in wetlands adjacent to the Dillant-Hopkins Airport in Swanzey on January 7th, and an AMERICAN WIGEON continued to be seen at the Hinsdale bluffs on the Connecticut River during the past week.

A GADWALL was seen again at Meadow Pond in Hampton during the past week.

A LONG-TAILED DUCK was seen at the Arch Bridge on the Connecticut River in Walpole on January 8th, and 2 were seen from Leavitt Park on Lake Winnipesauke in Meredith on the 8th.

An AMERICAN BITTERN was seen in Hampton Marsh on January 6th.

A LAPLAND LONGSPUR was seen at Krif Road in Keene on January 8th, and 1 was reported from the Dillant-Hopkins Airport in Swanzey on the 9th.

60 SNOW BUNTINGS, and 31 HORNED LARKS were seen at Hampton Beach State Park on January 6th, and 40 HORNED LARKS were seen along Chickering Road in Westmoreland on January 8th.

A CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was seen at a private residence on Noyes Street in Concord on January 7th.

A DICKCISSEL was seen at a private residence in Raymond on January 7th.

An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER, a PRAIRIE WARBLER, and a YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER continued to be seen at the Hampton Wastewater Treatment Plant during the past week and were last reported on January 8th.

A PINE WARBLER was seen at Odiorne Point State Park in Rye, and a YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER was seen in Mont Vernon, both during the past week.

A COMMON REDPOLL was reported from Chichester on January 4th.

An EASTERN PHOEBE was seen in Portsmouth on January 6th.

A BALTIMORE ORIOLE was seen along Great Bay Road in Greenland on January 8th.

A BROWN THRASHER was seen in Conway on January 8th.

Other lingering migrants reported during the past week included: DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, WOOD DUCK, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, TURKEY VULTURE, RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, AMERICAN KESTREL, MERLIN, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, NORTHERN FLICKER, WINTER WREN, HERMIT THRUSH, GRAY CATBIRD, CHIPPING SPARROW, FIELD SPARROW, VESPER SPARROW, and SAVANNAH SPARROW.

This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred. If you have seen any interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the recording or send your sightings to the RBA via email. Please put either “bird sighting” or “Rare Bird Alert” in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and phone number.

Thanks very much and good birding.

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