News & Events

This is New Hampshire Audubon’s Rare Bird Alert for Monday, September 27th, 2021

This is New Hampshire Audubon’s Rare Bird Alert for Monday, September 27th, 2021.

Birders on a weekend visit to Star Island, one of the Isles of Shoals, reported the following highlights: a LAZULI BUNTING (seen leaving the island early-on), 2 INDIGO BUNTINGS, 2 LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS, 2 YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOOS, 4 AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS, a “heard-only” UPLAND SANDPIPER, 3 CASPIAN TERNS, a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW, 2 BOBOLINKS, 4 YELLOW WARBLERS, a BLUE-WINGED WARBLER, a YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, a “heard-only” BLUE GROSBEAK, and 2 DICKCISSELS.

Clay-colored Sparrow, by Steve Mirick.

A male HOODED WARBLER, and a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW were seen at Odiorne Point State Park in Rye on September 25th and 26th.

A YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT was seen in the Meadow Pond area of Hampton on September 26th.

A BAY-BREASTED WARBLER was seen at Lake Sunapee on September 25th.

A CANADA WARBLER was seen at the Thorne Pond Conservation Area in Bartlett on September 21st, and 1 was reported from Waterville Valley on the 25th.

An AMERICAN COOT was seen on west Lake Massabesic in Manchester on September 25th.

An adult LITTLE BLUE HERON was seen at the Deer Hill Wildlife Management Area in Brentwood on September 21st, and a juvenile LITTLE BLUE HERON was seen at Witch Island in Hampton on the 23rd.

A GREAT EGRET was seen in Monroe on September 25th.

A WESTERN SANDPIPER was seen in coastal Hampton on September 22nd.

Single DICKCISSEL sightings were reported from Goss Farm in Rye, Greeley Park in Nashua, and Woodmont Orchard in Hollis, all during the past week.

A BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO was reported from Bedell Bridge State Park in Haverhill on September 21st and 22nd.

A CHIMNEY SWIFT was seen flying over Pack Monadnock on September 21st.

A COMMON NIGHTHAWK was seen in Antrim on September 24th, and 1 was seen in Center Harbor on the 21st.

A ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK was seen in Portsmouth on September 27th, and 1 was reported from Newfields on the 26th.

A late-migrating EASTERN KINGBIRD, and several late-migrating VEERYS and WOOD THRUSHES were reported, all during the past week.

Hawk migration is under way and observers have already counted over 7,124 raptors from the Pack Monadnock Raptor Migration Observatory. Be sure to visit and help the official counters!

This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred. If you have seen any interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the recording or send your sightings to the RBA via email. Please put either “bird sighting” or “Rare Bird Alert” in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and phone number.

Thanks very much and good birding.

Subscribe to New Hampshire Bird Records – learn more about birds and birding in New Hampshire (read a free article in each issue). This quarterly publication is produced by NH Audubon thanks to the work of many volunteers.

Explore 39 wildlife sanctuaries throughout all 10 counties of New Hampshire.

Committed to the conservation of ecologically important lands.

We regularly observe and count 14 species at NH Audubon’s Raptor Observatories.

NH Audubon Protects

The New Hampshire Audubon offers multiple opportunities for those interested in joining us as a member or donating for one of our various causes.

About Us

Founded in 1914, NH Audubon’s mission is to protect New Hampshire’s natural environment for wildlife and for people. It is an independent statewide membership organization with four nature centers throughout the state. Expert educators give programs to children, families, and adults at centers and in schools. Staff biologists and volunteers conduct bird conservation efforts such as the Peregrine Falcon restoration. NH Audubon protects thousands of acres of wildlife habitat and is a voice for sound public policy on environmental issues. For information on NH Audubon, including membership, volunteering, programs, sanctuaries, and publications, call 224-9909, or visit www.nhaudubon.org.